Saltwater fish care tips

Top kuhli loach care advices? The Cherry Barb originated from the shallow ponds of Sri Lanka. It grows up to be only 2 inches long and has a life span of 5 years. They are peaceful and easy to maintain, but they require a well-maintained tank. Keeping cherry barbs with other males could cause some rivalry, making their colors more vivid. They are dubbed “Tiger” Plecos because their stripes are similar to that of a tiger. They are native to the Amazon river, which makes them skilled in swimming against currents. It is advisable to set up an aquarium that provides a similarly powerful current because this is what they enjoy. They love to play hide-and-seek, so set up a tank with accessories that can serve as their hiding spots. This species can become more aggressive as it matures, so you should consider placing them in a large community tank to help lessen their aggressiveness.

Just like keeping any pet in the house, there are things you’ll need to watch when keeping tropical fish: Tropical fish can die very easily when something goes wrong with the tank. Often by the time you notice something is wrong with the tank or the fish, it will be too late for you to do anything for them (although you can take you lessons learned for the next aquarium you set up). Tropical fish do require more care than a plant; you must know how to change the water, clean the tank, and what to feed them. As opposed to bringing other type pets into the house, set up costs for fish keeping can be expensive. You’ll need to put in an investment in terms of the tank and the accessories. Plus many fish are not cheap! Tropical fish are living creatures. Things happen to them, even when you’re not paying attention. So they aren’t just design features and will require your frequent attention and care. If you keep your tropical fish tank without doing any research, things can get ugly! For example you can have algae blooms or snail infestations that are very hard to eradicate. See additional details at rainbow shark diet.

Return all the old clean decorations. If necessary, add more gravel or new decorations. Before adding new tap water to the aquarium, please treat it with a special conditioner. Everyone knows that tap water contains a lot of impurities such as chlorine, ammonia, and heavy metal salts. This water will harm the fish, so water conditioners have been developed that purify the water from harmful substances. Mix old and new treated water in the aquarium and measure its temperature. Control that the water remains the same temperature; otherwise, your fish will die. If necessary, dilute it with treated freshwater, or wait for the water to heat up and become room temperature if its temperature is lower or higher than the required level. Do not pour too much water into the aquarium; there must be space for air to saturate the water with oxygen. Carefully place the fish back. To make the fish experience less shock, you can put them in a plastic container with old water and put it in the aquarium; then, it will be easier for the fish to get used to slightly different water temperatures.

Reef aquarium bulbs should be replaced every 6 to 12 months. That means if you have 2 MH bulbs, you can replace one in January, the other in March, and switch every 3 months. This will let you get 6 months out of each bulb and keep your light spectrum more consistent. If you have a 6 bulb T5 fixture, you can replace 1 bulb every month, allowing you to keep your light intensity consistent yet replacing each bulb every 6 months with minimal stress on the coral. For optimal success in the reef aquarium hobby, you should create and stick to a regular reef aquarium maintenance schedule, or reef aquarium maintenance checklist. In order to help you achieve success in this hobby, I have created one for you that you may print and hang near your aquarium as a reminder of when you need to perform your aquarium maintenance. Just right-click the image below and click save. You can then print it from your computer. See additional info at aquarium tank.