Best tax lawyer in Houston in 2021

High professionalism IRS tax lawyer in Houston, Texas in 2021? Abstract of Judgment – While a judgment creditor cannot force you to sell your homestead, they can file an abstract of judgment in the real property records of your county. The filing of an abstract of judgment may prevent you from selling your home or re-financing your home. Credit Score – A judgment is a public record and will be pulled into your credit report and may damage your credit score. Even if you resolve the underlying debt, you may not be able to get the judgment removed from your credit report.

What is the downside to filing an Offer In Compromise with the IRS? If the IRS rejects your OIC, you have now provided the IRS all the information they need to know exactly how they can collect on the debt you owe, such as who your current employer is, where your bank accounts are and what kind of property you own. This is why you should have a Houston tax attorney analyze your situation and advise you of your options first rather than just filing an OIC as a one-size-fits-all approach. See extra information at more on this. As a bankruptcy lawyer in Houston, I primarily help people and companies file Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. I also help both individuals and companies resolve other debt issues. I have been practicing as a Chapter 7 lawyer in Houston and as a Chapter 13 lawyer in Houston for over 5 years. I think that customer help should be the no 1 priority in any business, but it is also very important important in the bankruptcy and debt settlement field. When people are struggling financially they may be stressed, nervous and scared about their situation. The prompt returning of telephone calls and e-mails is important so as to help alleviate anxiety. You can also take comfort in knowing that you will be speaking with an attorney every time you call or come in for an appointment. Dove Law Firm, PLLC is a Debt Relief Agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code as well as resolve other debt issues.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is like Chapter 11, which applies to businesses. In both cases, the petitioner submits a reorganization plan that safeguards assets against repossession or foreclosure and typically requests forgiveness of other debts. They both differ from the more extreme Chapter 7 filing, which liquidates all assets except those specifically protected. No bankruptcy filing eliminates all debts. Child support and alimony payments aren’t dischargeable, nor are student loans and unpaid taxes. But bankruptcy can clear away many other debts, though it will likely make it harder for the debtor to borrow in the future.

Harvest Your Capital Losses: If you own stocks that have lost money, you can sell them and deduct up to $3,000 on your federal taxes. Just be careful not to violate the wash-sale rule, which would disallow the deduction. This rule states you cannot purchase the same or a substantially similar stock within 30 days before or after the sale. “Some people think it’s OK if I do it using two accounts,” Zollars says. They may think they can sell a stock from a taxable account and then immediately purchase similar securities in an IRA. However, this is not allowed. “That’s not the way the rule works,” he says.

Moving expense to take first job: Here’s an interesting dichotomy: Job-hunting expenses incurred while looking for your first job are not deductible, but moving expenses to get to that first job are. And you get this write-off even if you don’t itemize. If you moved more than 50 miles, you can deduct 23 cents per mile of the cost of getting yourself and your household goods to the new area, (plus parking fees and tolls) for driving your own vehicle. However, beginning in 2018, moving expenses are no longer deductible for federal taxes unless you are in the military and the move is due to military orders. Some states such as California continue to provide this tax benefit. Read more information on https://dovebankruptcylaw.com/.

A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to keep your stuff and get on a more affordable repayment plan with your creditors. You’ll need to have enough income to afford the payments and be below the maximum total debt limits (currently nearly $400,000 for unsecured debts and $1 million-plus for secured debts). A court will approve the Chapter 13 repayment plan, which usually lasts three to five years, and your trustee will collect your payments and disburse them to your creditors. Once you finish the plan, the remainder of the unsecured debts is discharged.