Septic systems best provider in Arnold, CA

Copperopolis, California professional septic inspections services? Don’t pour grease down the drain. If you pour grease down your drain, it could clog your septic tank drain field. Grease doesn’t allow the soil around your drain field to absorb liquids, which could cause a back-up and result in the added expense of digging a new drain field. Purchase the right kind of garbage disposal. Consider investing in a top-of-the-line garbage disposal, which will do a better job grinding your food waste. The more ground your food, the better it will be absorbed in your septic tank system.

The most common cause of a failed system is overloading it. This can be caused by the consecutive use of high-volume activities such as laundry, showering, and running the dishwasher. Space out their usage as well as follow water conservation efforts year round. This is particularly important during heavy rain, which can quickly overwhelm a drainfield on its own. Also common are blockages, which can cause pipes to be clogged and the drainfield to overflow. To prevent this, avoid flushing anything besides the three Ps (pee, poop, and toilet paper). “Flushable” wipes and FOG (fats, oils, grease) clog pipes so should be thrown in the trash. Avoid the use of a garbage disposal which can improperly break down debris.

Periodic Septic Tank Maintenance is also essential to keep your system running. This is especially critical on advanced systems, with pumps, float, control panels & filters. We perform a very thorough maintenance and inspection on your system. During routine maintenance we open the entire system. All components,( i.e.- pumps, floats, filters splice boxes, P/D laterals, valve boxes and more) are checked, cleaned and flushed. Flushing of the P/D laterals is a very important part of the maintenance. Lateral pipes can get full of sludge / solids and not allow the effluent into the drain field trenches. In addition, flushing can remove early root mats growing into the lines through the trench. Discover extra details at foothill portables.

What Is a Septic System? A septic system is an on-site sewage treatment and disposal system that is usually buried underground. Septic systems consist of two main parts: a septic tank and a drain field. The septic tank is a watertight box, usually made of concrete or fiberglass, with an inlet and outlet pipe. All wastewater flows from the home to the septic tank through the sewer pipe. Septic tanks take wastewater and separate solid matter from it, which settles at the bottom of the septic tank. Once in the septic tank, heavy solids sink to the bottom, and bacteria reduces them to sludge and gases.

Save money by renting a backhoe and installing your own septic system! Stamped, engineered, septic system plans are typically not necessary unless your property percolation test was extreme (greater than 60 minutes per inch or less than 5 minutes per inch); or the site has seasonal groundwater; or there is bedrock or unsuitable soil less than four feet below the proposed leach field; or if the ground slope is in excess of 30% in the area of the proposed leach field. Engineered systems require a local professional engineer to approve (stamp) your site’s septic tank and leach field plans.

Kevin Gause is the owner of Foothill Sanitary Septic and Operation Manager for Foothill Portable Toilets which is owned by Leslie Gause. Kevin has over 20 years experience in solid and liquid waste transporting and 17 years experience in handling all aspects of septic, grease and portable toilet services. Kevin’s commitment is to provide all services with the utmost integrity and honesty. By providing quality workmanship and performing the job the way it should be done, customer satisfaction is achieved. Our first-time customers continually become our long term customers time and time again, choosing us for all their septic and portable toilet needs. This commitment is prevalent throughout the company.

A Dosing System introduces the effluent waste water from the septic tank to the drain field in intermittent intervals (doses) throughout the day. This allows the soil to absorb the “dosed” water in the drain field before more water is introduced. These types of systems are used in soils with poor absorption rates or shallow soils. There are two common types of dosing systems: The Siphon Dose and the Low Pressure Dose. A siphon dose system (not pictured) does not use an electrical discharge pump. It uses a siphon bell ( an inverted bell that is open on the bottom and traps air) that cycles as the water level rises and cause the effluent to dose into the drain field by a siphon action (Click on the link to the left to see how it actually works). A low pressure dosing system uses a pump in a pump chamber (as shown in picture on the left). The pump turns on intermittently through electronic controls and sends the effluent to the drain field in intervals throughout the day. Read additional details at https://www.foothillsanitary.com/.