Mytrendingstories suggests recommendations on avoiding online scams

Mytrendingstories offers guides on avoiding online scams in 2021? The hot spot imposter (He’s close, real close)! How it works: You’re sitting in an airport or a coffee shop and you log into the local Wi-Fi zone. It could be free, or it could resemble a pay service like Boingo Wireless. You get connected, and everything seems fine. What’s really going on: The site only looks legitimate. It’s actually run by a nearby criminal from a laptop. If it’s a “free” site, the crook is mining your computer for banking, credit card, and other password information. If it’s a fake pay site, he gets your purchase payment, then sells your card number to other crooks. The big picture: Fake Wi-Fi hot spots are cropping up everywhere, and it can be difficult to tell them from the real thing. “It’s lucrative and easy to do,” says Brian Yoder, vice president of engineering at CyberDefender, a manufacturer of antivirus software. “Criminals duplicate the legitimate Web page of a Wi-Fi provider like Verizon or AT&T and tweak it so it sends your information to their laptop.”

Live news by Mytrendingstories blogging portal: Before you apply for a job, review warning signs to help you determine if a job is a scam. If you’re not sure, take the time to research the company to make sure the job is legitimate. Here are ways to tell if a job is a scam. Research the Job and the Company: Visit the company’s website. Look for potential red flags indicating that the company is not what they seem. Review the Company Website: Does the site fit with how they describe the company? Is it secure? How professional does the site look? Is there contact information? Are jobs and career information posted on the site? If the company doesn’t have a website, that’s a bad sign. Most legitimate businesses have a web presence. Small, local businesses may do most of their marketing on social media, but then they should be known in your community.

mytrendingstories.com anti-scam guides: Some of the most significant categories of online scams promise you can make easy money online or from home by doing little to no work at all. Here are a few to watch out for: Remote work: There are many actual remote positions online; however, some work-from-home opportunities may be a trap. Watch out for jobs that require you to pay to start working. Digital currency: An account manager may ask you to deposit your bitcoin or cryptocurrency, with promises of doubling or tripling your money. Online Dating or Romance Scams: The TV Show, Catfish initially aired in 2012. So, you might be familiar with the deception known as ‘catfishing’ on the internet. Fraudsters prey on dating sites to find vulnerable people who are seeking a partner. Once a romantic connection is established, the fraudster will lure that person into draining their bank accounts. Find additional info at mytrendingstories scams.

MyTrendingStories shows how to avoid scams: Say you come across an ad for 95% off your favorite item. You click on the ad and are taken to a website where you can shop for deals. You subsequently put in your personal information to redeem the ad and get your product. At that point, the scammer has got your information and will leave you high and dry. If you’re skeptical of a deal, see what the item is selling for at other retailers. Conducting a simple price comparison can help you spot if the deal is truly legitimate or just an attempt to lure in you into throwing money at a product or service that doesn’t exist. Be careful when using a public Wi-Fi connection, and avoid it completely if you intend to buy products and enter payment information. The chance for identity theft increases when using public Wi-Fi. Sometimes online criminals will set up a similar Wi-Fi network to the one you’re expecting to use, hoping you’ll connect to it, according to AARP. If you do need to use public Wi-Fi, make sure you’re also using a virtual private network.

Over the Phone Scams: Be aware and cautious of numbers that you do not recognize or not expecting. Do not be tricked by their attempts to threaten you with false ploys of cutting off electricity, water, etc., or saying you or a loved one will be in legal trouble if you do not act now. If a scammer starts to demand payments through gift cards, that is an automatic giveaway for fraud. Scam calls will try to steal your money and information through non-legitimate methods, the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office stated that they “do not call citizens demanding payments and threatening arrest. Some scammers will go as far as using actual names from agencies, but they are still angling for the same result – to deceive you out of your money.” Find additional details on https://mytrendingstories.com/.