Avoiding online scams advices by Mytrendingstories writing platformtoday

Mytrendingstories suggests tips on avoiding online scamstoday? The not-so-sweet tweet (It’s a real long shot): How it works: You get a “tweet” from a Twitter follower, raving about a contest for a free iPad or some other expensive prize: “Just click on the link to learn more.” What’s really going on: The link downloads a “bot” (software robot), adding your computer to a botnet of “zombies” that scammers use to send spam email. The big picture: Scammers are taking advantage of URL-shortening services that allow Twitter users to share links that would otherwise be longer than the 140-character maximum for a tweet. These legitimate services break down a huge URL to ten or 15 characters. But when users can’t see the actual URL, it’s easy for bad guys to post malicious links. Avoidance maneuver: Before clicking on a Twitter link from a follower you don’t know, check out his profile, says Josh George, a website entrepreneur in Vancouver, Washington, who follows online scams. “If he’s following hundreds of thousands of people and nobody is following him, it’s a bot,” he says—a good tip to keep in mind for how to protect yourself online and avoid being scammed.

Latest news by Mytrendingstories.com blogging platform: Phishing is an attempt to get financial information directly from the consumer by posing as a legitimate company or financial institution. Most people know not to trust the Nigerian prince who wants wire them money, but phishing emails have evolved beyond these far-fetched plots. This type of fraudulent email typically comes in two parts: You are threatened with losing money. Examples of this include your PayPal account being suspended or fake unauthorized purchases made on your Amazon account. You are promised something for free. Flashy emails that ask you take a survey for a free gift card, enter to win a free iPad/iPhone, or participate in a free trial of a new diet pill could actually be the first steps in stealing your money. Never click on a link or sign up for offers in an unsolicited email. If you get an email from a vendor saying your account is suspended, visit that site directly to confirm. An example would be, if you are made to believe your PayPal account is suspended, go to paypal.com and log in to see if it’s true, don’t click any provided links. Discover more information at mytrendingstories scams.

mytrendingstories.com anti-scam advice: Maybe you wouldn’t be frightened by this scam or that scam. People are getting better at recognizing the common scams and ignoring them. But scammers keep adapting and they specialize in pushing emotional buttons with just-credible-enough claims. One day a scam could “get to you.” It will be a situation where you’ll be afraid that what you’re being told could be true. The scammer will put tremendous pressure on you to act before you have time to think or control the adrenaline rush, just like the couple in Hingham. Take the opportunity now — as with a fire drill — to plan for how you and your family and friends will deal with an “alarming news” message threatening to lead to some “dreadful” potential outcome.

Mytrendingstories shows how to defeat scams: If you receive an email from a major shipping service such as FedEx claiming that your package is delayed or there is a problem with your order, this might be a phishing scam. Typically, this kind of email will ask you to click on a link for more details of the purported problem. But clicking the link can result in downloading malware that hackers use to take information from your computer. Rather than click on the link, you should visit the shipper’s website directly and use your tracking or order confirmation number to verify the status of your package, according to CNBC. Reputable retailers will typically have a summary of who they are in an “About Us” section where you can check out the company’s background, values and mission. Legitimate companies also typically have a “Contact Us” section where shoppers can send service complaints and questions. Find additional information on Mytrendingstories.

WARNING: The coronavirus pandemic has seen a rise in scams. There has been an increase in criminals looking to exploit financial and health concerns by asking for money for fake services upfront, collecting personal information or bank details, or offering temptingly high returns on made-up investments or pension transfers. For full information see our blog on coronavirus scams to look out for and how to protect yourself. Scams are fraudulent schemes that dupe people into parting with their personal details and/or cash. They’ve been around for as long as we can remember, but they’re no longer confined to shady door-to-door salesmen or dodgy second-hand car dealers.