Mytrendingstories suggests recommendations on how to avoid being scammed on the internet

How to avoid scams advices by Mytrendingstories online publishing today? The hot spot imposter (He’s close, real close)! How it works: You’re sitting in an airport or a coffee shop and you log into the local Wi-Fi zone. It could be free, or it could resemble a pay service like Boingo Wireless. You get connected, and everything seems fine. What’s really going on: The site only looks legitimate. It’s actually run by a nearby criminal from a laptop. If it’s a “free” site, the crook is mining your computer for banking, credit card, and other password information. If it’s a fake pay site, he gets your purchase payment, then sells your card number to other crooks. The big picture: Fake Wi-Fi hot spots are cropping up everywhere, and it can be difficult to tell them from the real thing. “It’s lucrative and easy to do,” says Brian Yoder, vice president of engineering at CyberDefender, a manufacturer of antivirus software. “Criminals duplicate the legitimate Web page of a Wi-Fi provider like Verizon or AT&T and tweak it so it sends your information to their laptop.”

News with MyTrendingStories blogging portal: Stay Vigilant. You’ll want to keep a close eye out on your credit and financial account statements so you can alert your financial institution as soon as possible if anything appears amiss. If you’ve spent time job searching online lately, it might seem like there are as many scams as legitimate job openings on the job boards. The Better Business Bureau reports that job scams are on the rise and are the No. 1 riskiest scam in terms of prevalence, likelihood of losing money, and monetary loss. Each year, about 14 million people are exposed to job scams. Victims lose more than $2 billion per year, not counting the value of their time or the emotional impact of being defrauded. To safeguard yourself, it pays to learn as much as possible about employment scams.

MyTrendingStories anti-scam tips: Despite the misconception that fraudsters target senior citizens, a recent study by the FTC found that more millennials than retirees are now getting scammed out of money online. The Better Business Bureau warns about online fraud happening within social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. It starts with a “friend or relative” who contacts you, claiming that you are entitled to free money. But there’s a catch – they want you to pay upfront for shipping or provide your personal information. Follow these tips to avoid a social media scam: Don’t give out your password (and don’t use the same password for multiple accounts) ; Set your account to private and do not accept friend requests from people you don’t know; Always use a secure network, not public Wi-Fi; Keep apps, browsers, and antivirus software up-to-date. See even more information on mytrendingstories scams.

MyTrendingStories shows how to escape scams: So what’s the point of final sale items? To ward off return-happy customers. According to e-commerce analytics site Invesp, 30% of products ordered online are returned, compared with 8% of items purchased in-store. Although you don’t want to miss out on a good deal, subscribing to a lot of email lists can mean an overflowing inbox. Sure, promotions have a short shelf life, but there most likely is another one down the pipeline. Instead of getting a case of FOMO about promotions, it’s best to sign up for promotions when you’re in the hunt for something. This way you can give your inbox a break and not be tempted by unnecessary sale items.

What To Do If You Think You’re The Victim Of A Scam: If you suspect that you are a victim of a scam, alert your local sheriff’s department to make a report. Secure all your bank accounts. Call the number on the back of your bank card to explain why you suspect you may be experiencing fraud, and they will walk you through the next steps to take. The faster you act, the more likely you are to resolve the issue. For online victims, change all passwords immediately. Contact the three major credit bureaus to have a fraud alert placed on your account, adding a security freeze. Scams no longer target just the gullible. They still come in letters, texts and calls, but more crooks are now looking online for the chance to get their hands on your hard-earned cash. There are increasingly sophisticated ways scammers try to target YOUR cash. This guide explains what to look out for, how to protect yourself, and what to do if you’re a victim of a scam. Find more details at mytrendingstories.com.