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Geopolitical hot analysis by Zetpress? Starting Sunday and continuing through the week, Mr. Trump unleashed a series of fiery Twitter posts denouncing America’s “weak” border laws and vowing “NO MORE DACA DEAL.” And while Mr. Trump’s Twitter feed isn’t always an indication of federal policy, it paved the way for new policy proposals and announcements. On Wednesday, Mr. Trump issued a proclamation directing the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security to work with governors to deploy the National Guard on the southwest border to help combat illegal immigration. Mexican officials sharply criticized the plan to add troops. The president’s renewed anti-immigration fervor was in part inspired by news reports of a large group of migrants from Honduras traveling through Mexico to the United States. The caravan later began to splinter, although organizers said it would regroup.

Resistance to this proper understanding of China’s position in the international system remains strong. But it is unquestionably the case that both Republicans and Democrats are starting to see China more as a threat than a partner. And it is Donald Trump who is behind this clarification of vision. (Xi Jinping and the pandemic helped too.) Whatever a President Biden might do about China — and he seems far more interested in repairing our alliances in “Old Europe” than in tackling this paramount challenge of the 21st century — he would operate within the constraints Trump established and on the intellectual terrain Trump landscaped.

US Foreign politics and Brexit 2020 latest : After a spring and summer dominated by the pandemic and the lockdown, the U.K. and the EU are back to fighting about Brexit. In other words, nature is healing. The latest fracas between the two feuding divorcées involves the British Internal Markets Bill, which was introduced by Boris Johnson’s government last week. The purpose of the bill is to ensure barrier-free trade between all four constituent nations of the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland) and to guarantee that other countries have access to the entirety of the U.K. market when they cut trade deals when the British government.

In every instance we adhered to the process explicitly laid out in the Constitution: The president has the constitutional duty to nominate; the Senate has the constitutional obligation to provide advice and consent. It is written plainly in the Constitution that both presidents and senators swear an oath to uphold and defend. Is Biden saying that McConnell should ignore his sacred constitutional duty? Biden knew then, as he knows now, that there’s no constitutional duty, nor is there any precedent, either prohibiting or requiring Republicans to fill a vacancy. Nor is there any prohibition (as nearly every Democrat has already argued) against “rushing” such a nomination. Three Supreme Court justices have been confirmed with less than 45 days — including Ginsburg, who was nominated by a Democrat and confirmed by a Democrat-majority Senate. As my colleague Dan McLaughlin points out in meticulous historical detail, every real norm points to the Republicans’ filling the vacancy. See more info at https://zetpress.com/.