Natural Cordyceps Sinensis online store

Premium Cordyceps Sinensis online shopping? Luckily, there is a species of Cordyceps that has a compound profile extremely similar to C. sinesis, known as Cordyceps militaris. In fact, these two mushrooms have historically been used interchangeably in traditional Chinese medicine. Thanks to recent breakthroughs, the actual fruiting body of C. militaris can be cultivated reliably and affordably. The method of cultivation doesn’t even require the use of insects. This means that cultivated C. militaris can be considered vegan, and can deliver all the same benefits as C. sinesis without the high price or the ecological impact of harvesting a diminishing resource. Producing the actual fruiting body also helps to make certain the identity of the fungus, since Cordyceps militaris is easily recognizable.

In Bhutan, Cordyceps are mostly collected in the two main pristine alpine meadows of Laya, Lunana, and Bumthang. Other regions are also emerging in Trashiyangtse and Lhuentse. In Bhutan, the government first implemented sustainable harvest guidelines in 2004. This allows only household members from registered local villagers to harvest cordyceps in Bhutan, within the village’s vicinity for a limited time in a year. To ensure the protection of the environment, the sustainability of the Cordyceps and the collectors, the collection is overseen by local leaders and forestry services, who also keep an eye out for poachers.

Researchers have found that the mycelia of domestic Cordyceps sinensis varieties contain the same pharmacological components and medicinal properties as the original, wild Cordyceps. This also applies to (domestic) mycelia of Cordyceps militaris. Every year, in late June, licensed Bhutanese farmers will ascend the sacred mountains in the regions of Paro, Wangduephodrang, Gasa, Lhuntse, Trashigang, Trashiyangtse, and Bumthang in search of Cordyceps. Read even more information on buy raw cordyceps.

The Royal Government of Bhutan legalized the harvesting of cordyceps in 2004. Since then, cordyceps have been harvested extensively in the alpine meadows of the country at elevations of above 5000 meters above sea level. Environmental conditions play a key determinant in the quality of the cordyceps. When it comes to harvesting, only handpicking is allowed to ensure that there is minimal damage to the environment. The harvesting of cordyceps in Bhutan is highly regulated. Only households belonging from specific region is allowed to harvest and harvesting is only allowed for a month period.

This year Cordyceps collection permits were issued to more than 900 collectors in Bumthang, of which most of them are people from the Chhoekhor Gewog. What is Cordyceps sinensis? Cordyceps sinensis, also known as Chinese caterpillar fungus, is a parasitic fungus found in Hepialus worms. During winter, the fungus spores enter the worm and develop its mycelium by absorbing the worm’s nutrients. The worm later died when fully filled with the fungus mycelium. Upon maturity in the summer, the fungus grows out of the worm’s head to a length of about 3 to 10 cm. Read more information at https://cordycepssinensis.org/.