Several Holiday fashion tips

Cotton trousers or combats are great, as are plain T-shirts and shirts. Take a large, cotton scarf to cover your head, shoulders or any other cheeky bits should the necessity arise. A long skirt is essential: it’s modest, suitable for smart occasions, keeps you cool and is handy for loo-breaks. Let me explain: in a lot of countries, sit-down toilets are not the norm. If you have to squat over a hole in the ground, it’s much easier to stop a skirt from touching the less-than-lemony-fresh floor than it is to protect your trousers. Of course, there’s a dead simple solution to these fashion dilemmas. When you reach your destination, go to your nearest market, buy some fabric, take it to a tailor’s stall and get a local-style outfit made for you. In a matter of hours, you’ll have a unique, bespoke little number all of your own, and you’ll know it meets local standards.

You want a backpack that is big enough to hold just a bit more than the stuff you are bringing and not more than that. If a backpack fits everything you want, has a bit of extra room, and feels comfortable, then you have found the perfect backpack size. Manufacturers also have suggested torso and waist sizes for each model they produce, but I’ve found that the best way to know if a backpack feels right is to simply try it on. When you are at the store (and any good camping/outdoors store will do this), they should be able to stuff your backpack with the equivalent of 30 pounds (15 kilograms) so you can see how that much weight feels on your back.

Internal frame – The majority of backpacks today are internal-frame packs, meaning the support rods and frame are built into the backpack and hidden from view. However, there some are still external-frame backpacks, where the rods are separate from the actual pack and stick out (think of those backpacks you see in old hiking movies or movies about people backpacking Europe in the 1970s – a big, clunky metal frame). Don’t get one of those. Make sure you buy a backpack with an internal frame. It not only looks better but the rods won’t get caught on anything and your bag will also be slimmer, making moving around easier. Additionally, internal-frame packs tend to be lighter as the frame is composed of a carbon fiber or tough plastic, which makes them easier on your back as well as more durable.

Hiking gear : The first layer is called your base layer, or next-to-skin layer, as it sits just above your breathable underwear, hugging the skin. It should not be too tight as this restricts blood circulation and inhibits the breathability characteristics of the wickable fibres, but equally it should not be too lose as this creates air gaps that undermine the layering process. A good word to describe how this layer should feel is, snug. The material for your base layer should be lightweight and made from high wicking fabrics like 100% merino wool.

Backpacking Essentials : Don’t Buy All Your Backpacking Equipment at Once Start out with a few basics and take a 1-night backpacking trip, during a warm time of year, with no rain in the forecast, to a location you already know. On your first trip take note of items that you may or may not need in your pack. After returning home you can reduce or buy more backpacking gear if / as required. It will take some time to find out what you actually need or what fits you the best. Hiking shoes : Low-cut models with flexible midsoles are excellent for day hiking. Some ultralight backpackers may even choose trail-running shoes for long-distance journeys. Materials impact a boot’s weight, breathability, durability and water resistance. Synthetics: Polyester, nylon and so-called “synthetic leather” are all commonly found in modern boots. They are lighter than leather, break in more quickly, dry faster and usually cost less. Downside: They may show wear sooner due to more stitching on the outside of the boot.

Wear your most comfortable pair of jeans or leggings-preferably in a dark color. Top off your look with a simple tee and a cozy sweater or relaxed blazer. Finally, twist on a scarf (or pack one in your carry-on). We all know that planes get chilly! I usually like to keep my jacket and scarf packed in my carry-on to cut down on the time I spend getting ready to go through security. If I already have these layers off, then I don’t need to worry about taking them on and off during the security screening. Once I’m through security, I usually pile these items on to prepare for the artic temps to come on the plane.

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